Insulin Intensification in Type 2 Diabetes (Pharmacists)

Research Review E-Learning Module

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Insulin Intensification in Type 2 Diabetes (Pharmacists)

This Research Review E-Learning Module is intended for New Zealand pharmacists. It provides information on New Zealand guidelines and glycaemic targets with a focus on insulin intensification, including reviewing patients on basal insulin, adding mealtime insulins and addressing patients concerns about insulin. It is based on the Research Review Educational Series publication ‘Insulin intensification in type 2 diabetes’.


Before starting the module please read the Research Review Educational Series publication, accessed through the link below:

Insulin Intensification in Type 2 Diabetes

The PDF can be viewed on screen, saved and printed through the link above. 

This E-Learning Module covers:

  • A brief overview of type 2 diabetes pathophysiology
  • New Zealand glycaemic targets and treatment guidelines
  • Rationale for insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes
  • Rationale for insulin intensification in type 2 diabetes
  • Insulin intensification protocols for type 2 diabetes
  • Clinical inertia in treatment of type 2 diabetes
  • Choice of insulin formulation in type 2 diabetes

Learning outcomes

After completing this module you should have an improved understanding of:

  • New Zealand glycaemic targets and treatment guidelines
  • The rationale for insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes
  • The rationale for insulin intensification in type 2 diabetes
  • Insulin intensification protocols for type 2 diabetes
  • Causes and consequences of clinical inertia in type 2 diabetes
  • Choosing and switching insulin formulations in type 2 diabetes

Contributing experts

Expert commentary is provided by endocrinologist Dr Brandon Orr-Walker

Module questions have been developed by Dr Chris Tofield who works part time in General Practice in Tauranga, New Zealand, is involved in clinical research and is a clinical advisor to the Bay of Plenty District Health Board.

Accreditation

Accreditation number: 2020/02; Expiry 30/01/2022. This online learning activity has been accredited by PSNZ ENHANCE for 1 hour of group 2 learning and pharmacists may allocate 2 group 2 points on successful completion of this learning activity evidenced by receipt of Research Review Certificate of Completion.

References

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